Without new patient-focused strategies, change is merely substitution not evolution

The age-old methodologies do not solve for America’s aging and diverse populations.

Healthcare is becoming less about the business and more about the individual

Diverse and aging patient populations are impacting and influencing the way healthcare is delivered.

Relationships with all patient populations require intimacy

All patients are people and thus want to feel their healthcare providers are listening and understand their unique needs

Know who you solve for

Organizations need the right intelligence and best practices to operationalize changes to win the battles for diverse talent, strengthen strategic partnerships, and gain the trust and loyalty of populations that are creating constructive disruption.

Healthcare Leadership Must Shift From Cottage Industry To Big Business

06/09/2014 09:56am

For several years, the healthcare industry has been teetering on the brink of upheaval. With the launch of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), it’s now facing a state of emergency – one in which the current changes are shining a spotlight on the fact that healthcare has become a fragmented industry of silos. Today, the onus of navigating the healthcare system is put on consumers (patients), which is further complicated as they are passed from doctor to doctor, department to department, and specialist to specialist.

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Healing Tension Points Will Unlock the Hispanic Healthcare Opportunity

29/08/2013 06:37am

According to a Cancer Journal for Clinicians report cited by City of Hope in 2012, the leading cause of death in the U.S. Hispanic community is cancer – even though heart disease has held that distinction among all Americans since 1921. Earlier that same year, the American Diabetes Association revealed that young Latinos have the highest growth rate of diabetes of any group in the country.

 

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Part 2-The Biggest Issues For The Future Of Healthcare In America And What We Can Learn From Them

03/11/2016 06:00am

As healthcare in America moves from a cottage industry to big business and gets progressively consolidated, regulated, and systematized, the industry has found itself at a crossroads with its customers (i.e., patients). A patient-centric and patient-focused model requires healthcare providers to change their businesses to a relationship-based model in which they provide value and grow together with their patients and customers from birth to end of life.

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Part I-The Biggest Issues For The Future Of Healthcare In America And What We Can Learn From Them

31/10/2016 03:58pm

As healthcare in America moves from a cottage industry to big business and gets progressively consolidated, regulated, and systematized, the industry has found itself at a crossroads with its customers (i.e., patients). Healthcare has technically always been patient-centric of course but like many business it never really focused on those patients – their unique needs and their relationship with them. In other words, healthcare like all business today has become less about the business defining the individual and more about the individual defining the business. A patient-centric and patient-focused model requires healthcare providers to change their businesses to a relationship-based model in which they provide value and grow together with their patients and customers from birth to end of life.

 

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Healthcare Industry Must Reinvent Itself Using Leadership Techniques from Business World

08/07/2014 11:30pm

Part 1 of this article dealt with the healthcare industry’s transition from cottage industry to big business over the past several decades. Because leadership did not keep pace with this evolution, they now find themselves lacking the required change management competencies to effectively lead and rapidly turn-around the reinvention of the current healthcare business model.

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The Future of Healthcare

To reinvent the way healthcare works and impacts our lives, the industry’s relationships with its patients must evolve.

Recent provider, payer, and physician strategies in healthcare have focused on “volume to value” – transitioning from a physician-led, fee-based system to a patient-focused, performance-based system to improve quality and reduce costs. But what often gets missed when discussing value-based strategies are the huge strategic implications of our diverse and aging populations. These populations are influencing discussions on how the industry should serve them, forcing it to engage them authentically and compelling the creation of strategies that enable and ensure sustainable growth.

As healthcare in America moves from a cottage industry to big business and gets progressively consolidated, regulated, and systematized, the industry has found itself at a crossroads with patients, especially diverse and aging patient populations. Healthcare has technically always been patient-centric. But today the industry needs patent-centric and patient-focused models. That requires the industry to focus on population health and have relationships with those patient populations to provide value.

Hospitals and healthcare providers are certainly aware of this problem and the need to evolve the way they view, treat, and interact with patients as they grow together from birth to end of life. They constantly cite difficulty in changing organizational culture and raising patient satisfaction as the biggest issues they face. That difficulty is unsurprising given healthcare has basically been organized and treated patients the same fee-for-service way since World War II.

To improve health outcomes today, providers and payers need to move away from rewards for volume-driven care and shift to value-driven care, which rewards providers for keeping people healthy while still keeping costs in check. Healthcare needs to focus on population health as shift and aging populations grow in size and gain more access to healthcare, which is increasing costs through inefficiencies in patient care, delivery, discharge, and follow-up (and driving re-admittance). A focus on population health supports business strategies that invest in people by putting the unique needs and differences of all people at the center of their growth strategies. But transformation on that scale requires new organizational competencies to help businesses and the industry solve for the following opportunity gaps:

  • Executive Leadership Mentality/Competency: Expanding the approach to diversity and inclusion as a strategy to strengthen our business models.
  • Workforce Representation: Solidifying employer brands and employee impact and influence and develop the next generation of leaders.
  • Patient Experience and Delivery Gap: Embracing cultural fluency to increase diverse and aging patient population intimacy with physicians and others culturally equipped to help them.
  • Preventive Care Gap: Creating platforms for self-advocacy and improved health outcomes by welcoming shift and aging populations into the healthcare industry and recognizing the vulnerabilities surrounding their immediate healthcare needs and overall cost of care.